15 Strange Meals of the World (Part I)

By Village Mayor • Feb 19th, 2009 • Category: Latest Post, The Best of Village of Joy, Weird

Once on the internet I read a saying that goes something like this: one man’s nightmare may just be another man’s delicacy. World is big and different people eat different things. So I’ve googled 15 strange and bizarre meals. Sure there are some meals I would never eat… or would I? What about you guys? Who can tell me how these things taste? I think :) I’d be brave enough to try them all but ‘Live Octopus Dish’… Eating something that’s still moving just not my cup of tea…:)

1. Balut – Embryo and Yolk

A balut is a fertilized duck (or chicken) egg with a nearly-developed embryo inside that is boiled and eaten in the shell. They are common, everyday food in some countries in Southeast Asia, such as in the Philippines, Cambodia, and Vietnam.

(Image Credits: Marshall Astor – Food Pornographer)

Popularly believed to be an aphrodisiac and considered a high-protein, hearty snack, balut are mostly sold by street vendors at night in the regions where they are available. They are often served with beer.

(Image Credits: Jon Young UK)

2. Deep-Fried Crickets

Crickets are eaten by humans in some African and Asian cultures, where they are often considered a delicacy. There have been movements to promote the eating of insects in Western countries because of high protein content, often with little success as most Western people are naturally repulsed by insects.

(Image Credits: Xosé Castro)

(Image Credits: CrazyMonkeyHouse)

3. Deep-fried cockroaches

(Image Credits: Spolster)

4. Pig Brain

5. Roasted Guinea Pig

Guinea pigs were originally domesticated for their meat in the Andes. It continues to be a major part of the diet in Peru and Bolivia, particularly in the Andes Mountains highlands; it is also eaten in some areas of Ecuador and Colombia. Because guinea pigs require much less room than traditional livestock and reproduce extremely quickly, they are a more profitable source of food and income than many traditional stock animals, such as pigs and cows; moreover, they can be raised in an urban environment.

(Image Credits:  jdklub)

Guinea pig meat is high in protein and low in fat and cholesterol, and is described as being similar to rabbit and the dark meat of chicken. The animal may be served fried, broiled, or roasted

(Image Credits: 10b travelling)

Peruvians consume an estimated 65 million guinea pigs each year, and the animal is so entrenched in the culture that one famous painting of the Last Supper in the main cathedral in Cusco shows Christ and the twelve disciples dining on guinea pig.

6. Silkworm kabobs

(Image Credits: jntolva)

7. Deep-fried Scorpions

Fried scorpions are quite commonly seen on Asian markets. You can taste them in China, Thailand, Cambodia, Bangkok. Scorpions same as insects are high in protein and apparently consist of important fatty acids and vitamins.

(Image Credits: jntolva)

Recipe: Scorpions on a bed of endives and herb cheese

Remove the stings and pincers from the scorpions. Marinate for 30 minutes in white wine, honey and lemon. Bake in a 250°C oven for 5 minutes. Stir-fry the endives, together with garlic, pepper and salt. Serve them hot on plates and add 50 g of herb cheese, allowing it to melt. Top each plate with a few scorpions.

(Image Credits: jntolva)

8. Sannakji – Live Octopus Dish

(Image Credits: toughkidcst)

The Korean delicacy sannakji, is very special dish, as the seafood isn’t quite dead. Live baby octopus are sliced up and seasoned with sesame oil. The tentacles are still squirming when this dish is served and, if not chewed carefully, the tiny suction cups can stick to the mouth and throat.

9. Deer placenta soup

(Image Credits: weirdmeat.com)

There’s also mushrooms, flowers, black chicken, and deer tendon in the broth. The placenta bits where elastic but not rubbery. The portion is small, especially considering you’re paying 158 RMB (over 20 USD) for a small bowl.

Deer placenta is said to be good for — these guys are good at marketing! — male sexual performance, kidneys, women’s skin, people of all ages, and in all seasons. Hmmm. How can you continue life without it? No worries, you can order deer placenta in pills! You can read more about this dish on weirdmeat.com

10. Fried Tarantulas

11. Lamb Testicles

(Image credits: Fraser Lewry)

12. Bee larvae

13. Cazu Marzu

Found in the city of Sardinia in Italy, casu marzu is a cheese that is home to live insect larvae. These larvae are deliberately added to the cheese to promote a level of fermentation that is close to decomposition, at which point the cheese’s fats are broken down. The tiny, translucent worms can jump up to half a foot if disturbed, which explains why some people prefer to brush off the insects before enjoying a spoonful of the pungent cheese.

14. Ox Penis

(Image credits: (monica))

15. Spotted Dick

(Image Credits: Telstar Logistics)

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